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Kestler Family Guardians

Tibetan Mastiff

Estate & Family Guardian Breeder

 

Gallery

Sansa
Sansa
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Falkor Rolling in the Grass
Falkor Rolling in the Grass
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Jason with Falkor & Sansa
Jason with Falkor & Sansa
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Willow with one of her puppies.
Willow with one of her puppies.
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Puppies - 2019
Puppies - 2019
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Bog Dog & Falkor Goofing Around
Bog Dog & Falkor Goofing Around
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Livestock Trained - Tibetan Mastiff
Livestock Trained - Tibetan Mastiff
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Bog Dog and Falkor
Bog Dog and Falkor
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Bog Dog
Bog Dog
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Puppies - Willow 2019
Puppies - Willow 2019
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The Ladies - Alpacas
The Ladies - Alpacas
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Willow the Matriarch
Willow the Matriarch
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Falkor and Will 2018
Falkor and Will 2018
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Bog Dog - 18 months
Bog Dog - 18 months
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Sorcha - 8 months old
Sorcha - 8 months old
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Willow and her puppies - 2019
Willow and her puppies - 2019
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Sansa
Sansa
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Bog Dog 2019
Bog Dog 2019
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Shamen
Shamen
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Barn Life
Barn Life
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Falkor
Falkor
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Information

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Grooming Your Tibetan Mastiff 

Depending on the climate, the Tibetan Mastiff will seasonally shed his dense under coat to stay cool. If they do shed, Mastiffs will require extra brushing to keep their coat from looking sloppy. Their long coat should be brushed several times a week with a wire slicker brush to prevent matting.

Tibetan Mastiffs are very slow to mature and can take up to 3-4 years to fully develop. As they grow older their coats come out easier and in tuffs.

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The Do-Khyi

Tibetan Mastiffs were called 'Do-Khyi' in Tibet which means the dog that can be chained. They are believed to have evolved from an extinct stone age dog and they first made their way to the Western world during the time of Alexander the Great. These loyal and fearless dogs were known to guard the Tibetan Monasteries and protect livestock, villages and caravans. In the 14th century, Marco Polo came across them and claimed that they were the size of donkeys. This has been supported by archaeologist excavations, where skeletons of the early Tibetan Mastiffs were found to be considerably larger than the Tibetan Mastiffs that we know today.

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Located in Northern Illinois

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